Feb 21, 2019 | HANSON

BTTI 2019 Follow Up Survey

If you attended Back To The Island 2019, we want your feedback. Please fill out the follow up survey HERE.

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Public Forums | News | BTTI 2019 Follow Up Survey - News Discussion

11

TheWanderer

Kaitlin Walbright
Columbus, OH, US

i think hanson likes melia more than anyone else

and if hanson really listened to the fans, we wouldnt be going back to melia.

8

asphodelia

Paola Rizzato
Heysham, Lancashire, GB

@Kait, I know. It doesn't make sense, does it? The only thing that does is the possible 3 year contract thing. 

I know Hanson won't be reading this but I doubt they'd like to pay 5 star prices and then have no hot water, or have a scalding hot shower. 

3

Rosalind

Damp rooms, damp bed sheets, leaky roofs, pools of water on the floors, broken toilets, no hot water.... all these issues add up. Plenty of people have not been happy about Melia, it's time they they start listening.

1

Vickykin23

I think it was always planned to be at Melia, even from last year the week of btti20 was blocked off on Melia website so wasn’t taking bookings for that week! Also on Melia website it states you can have 3 adults per room but IG only allow 2 per room, a lot of people I’ve spoken to haven’t gone to btti due to there being 3 in their group and they all want to be together/ not pay for a single room or share with someone they don’t know! Lots of rooms have 2 double beds so easily sleep 3 people. This would open it up to more people too plus might drop the cost a little 

8

asphodelia

Paola Rizzato
Heysham, Lancashire, GB

@Vicky would you want a BTTI that allowed a lot more people though? That happened with Cancun (2015) when they opened up extra spaces by allowing a roommate in certain rooms. Turns out that they needed to fund the trip to the 'desert island' where the final show was taking place. That year definitely felt very 'busy'. 

This year felt really quiet and relaxed (even if it was sold out). The whole idea is that you pay a lot but you also get to see Hanson playing to 400 people. Add another 100-200 people and you lose that sense of intimacy and that relax vibe.

14

taysbear

Carrie Nairn
Hagerstown , Maryland , US

I agree Paola 

6

kellylizbeth

Kelly Davis
Astoria, New York, US

This year felt really quiet and relaxed (even if it was sold out). The whole idea is that you pay a lot but you also get to see Hanson playing to 400 people. Add another 100-200 people and you lose that sense of intimacy and that relax vibe.

I've been to shows with more than 400 people that still felt "relaxed." I think it's less about the size of the audience and more about the vibes/how people behave. I don't think moving to a moderately bigger resort to accommodate more people would necessarily compromise the intimate feel of the event, if managed properly.

I guess my thing about capping the event at the current size is that the longer BTTI goes on, if demand keeps growing as it has over the last few years, it will get to the point where the only people who have any hope of booking rooms are "veterans" who have attended for several years in the past, and that sucks if you're not one of those people. I think giving priority to returning attendees made sense in the event's early years when they were trying to get it off the ground and attract a critical mass of participants, but now it's unnecessary and exclusionary. If somebody's been to all 6 or 7 BTTIs so far, odds are they're not going to quit going just because they don't get priority booking. And if they did, there are plenty of people who would like to go who will fill those spots.

7

eek_a_mouse

"I guess my thing about capping the event at the current size is that the longer BTTI goes on, if demand keeps growing as it has over the last few years, it will get to the point where the only people who have any hope of booking rooms are "veterans" who have attended for several years in the past, and that sucks if you're not one of those people. I think giving priority to returning attendees made sense in the event's early years when they were trying to get it off the ground and attract a critical mass of participants, but now it's unnecessary and exclusionary. If somebody's been to all 6 or 7 BTTIs so far, odds are they're not going to quit going just because they don't get priority booking. And if they did, there are plenty of people who would like to go who will fill those spots."  @Kelly


I agree. My husband and I have thought about it but never gone.  It's starting to seem like an exclusive club.  I've seen people say, "Oh, don't worry if you can't get a spot right away (after the regulars have already reserved). Somebody always wants to sell theirs later on." ...To me, that doesn't seem like a fun way to plan a trip.  I hate buying concert tickets and this sounds a whole lot worse -- waiting to jump on second-hand bookings, if and when they show up.  (...Also, for that kind of money, the accommodations sound a bit sketchy <see above comments in this thread> which doesn't exactly make me want to commit...)

1

Elianepferreira

I agree with @Kelly and @eek_a_mouse.

8

asphodelia

Paola Rizzato
Heysham, Lancashire, GB

But @Kelly, @Claudia @Eliane - I don't know where you're getting this information that nobody can get a room at BTTI? It's not true. Just because there are several pre-sales by year of attendance, it doesn't mean that all  those people will be booking. In fact, a lot of the people who went the first couple of years don't go (I know a whole group of them). A lot of people who started to go in 2015 are not going this year, or missed last year and so on. For all we know, there might be only 10-20 people in each presale, at least for the first 2. 

So if you want to go, it will totally be possible to get a room on the general sale. In fact, the only year when it totally sold out within 30 mins of general sale was Cancun. Last year (as in, for 2019) sold out 2-3 days into the general sale. 

Seriously, if you want to go, log on at 10 AM EDT on general sale (I think it's next Monday) and you will get a room. They might not be the 'Level' rooms - but all the rooms are nice. My friend stayed in the cheapest room in 2018 and she had fewer problems - no hot water issues. I went to her room and it was lovely, with a balcony, in fact the room was nicer than my Level Romance Suite.

@Claudia, the resort isn't awful. Is it overrated it? Imo it is. Is it overpriced? Imo it is. But is it awful? No, it's very nice, clean, with nice pools and mostly good food. It's difficult for IG to find a resort with a private beach (because that's what happened in Cancun - open beaches have to be fenced off) so the choice is probably quite limited, and one thing I will say about the Melia, is that at least it offers that 'Greenhouse' as a Plan B for bad weather.

On the numbers side, @Kelly agree to disagree. Personally, for me what made me book my first BTTI in 2014 (for 2015) was the small numbers. That's what I pay for and going by the larger numbers we had in Cancun, I would say that, to me, there was definitely a difference in terms of the intimate settings at shows.



6

kellylizbeth

Kelly Davis
Astoria, New York, US

@Paola Agree to disagree :) <3

Personally I don't believe there should be any kind of status hierarchy within the fan club. If you're an HNET member, you should have the same access to music, tickets and events as everyone else (like at HDay). If they want to throw people an extra gift in the BTTI merch package for being return attendees, I'm totally fine with that. But I don't think repeat attendance should guarantee earlier booking, better or cheaper rooms, or any other perks. 

With an event that is as in-demand as BTTI now is, there's no business case for it. It's not like airline loyalty programs, where Delta has to incentivize you to fly with them instead of American or United, who basically provide the exact same service. If you're a Hanson fan, there's only one BTTI, so there is no economic need to entice people with loyalty perks. It just creates extra layers of privilege where, at this point, there is no reason not to have a level playing field.

8

asphodelia

Paola Rizzato
Heysham, Lancashire, GB

@Kelly but don't you think they have to stagger bookings anyway? It's not as if Island Gigs is Ticketmaster. I doubt they could handle capacity with, say, 400 people trying to book at the same time. They're a very small operation, and as far as I know, everything is pretty much handled by Sven. I think it's very wise to stagger the process because in 6 years now (6 bookings) I've never, ever encountered a problem. Could I say that about booking tickets for HDay? Nope.

I guess that staggering by year of attendance is just one of many ways they could do it. If they did it by alphabetical order, it would be unfair to, say, people like me with a surname initial at the end of the alphabet. I don't see a truly 'fair' way of doing it, and whatever they picked, people would still find a reason to complain and call it unfair.

8

asphodelia

Paola Rizzato
Heysham, Lancashire, GB

@Kelly, also - you know I love you but: 'extra layers of privilege, a level playing field'? Seriously? We're talking about a luxury holiday, essentially. People can still book it, there will be rooms on Monday 18th. Anyone who had $400 to put down on a deposit will be able to sign up on general presale, which is way more of a level playing field than most concert ticket sales, where within 3 nanoseconds all tickets have gone and the only way to get one is to give a scalper $1,000.

6

kellylizbeth

Kelly Davis
Astoria, New York, US

@Paola Okay, but aren't there alternatives to Ticketmaster to handle a high-volume booking, that Hanson/Island Gigs could adopt if they wanted to? I go a festival that sells thousands of tickets all at once every year through Eventbrite. Or better yet, why not invest in upgrading HNET so its servers can actually handle the traffic they know to expect every time they put any kind of event on sale?

6

kellylizbeth

Kelly Davis
Astoria, New York, US

@Kelly, also - you know I love you but: 'extra layers of privilege, a level playing field'? Seriously? We're talking about a luxury holiday, essentially.

Okay, so because luxury vacations are frivolous anyway, it doesn't matter if booking is handled fairly? Not sure I understand what your point is here. (I love you too!)

8

asphodelia

Paola Rizzato
Heysham, Lancashire, GB

@Kelly my point is that if we were talking about welfare, job opportunities, healthcare, complaining about a level playing field makes sense. But we're discussing about giving Hanson thousands of dollars. And (I repeat ad nauseam), people can do that, if they want to, because there are plenty of rooms to satisfy demand. And they're cheaper.

Before the Melia, when the cheaper rooms would sell first and people at general sale were left with the most expensive ones (I was on my first booking for Cancun), people would complain about that. Now people complain that they can't get Level. 


6

kellylizbeth

Kelly Davis
Astoria, New York, US

Before the Melia, when the cheaper rooms would sell first and people at general sale were left with the most expensive ones (I was on my first booking for Cancun), people would complain about that. Now people complain that they can't get Level.

Right. So the issue is, everyone wants the chance to book the type of room they prefer, whether that's the least-expensive available, or the most luxurious/closest to the stage/whatever. 

My point is, why shouldn't that privilege (or option, if you don't like the word "privilege" for its contemporary social connotations) be extended to all attendees equally?

10

lilzacbop

Katie Wanta
Orange, CT, US

The only time I ever had an issue with booking was the first year - when everyone was trying to book at once. 

1

Elianepferreira

@Kelly If everyone pays to be a fan club member, it makes sense for everyone to have the same rights regardless of how many times they went to the event.

11

skyblue17

Joanne Villani
New York, NY , US

I honestly can't imagine not staggering the booking. There are nine room types. It takes at least a few minutes to book, so what happens if while you're booking, your room type sells out? You start over? You're bumped to a different room type by default? It just sounds messy, for those booking and for the booking system, especially if people will need to be re-accommodated because of so many bookings being made at once. Not to mention that when booking is staggered, it allows Island Gigs to quickly fix issues as they happen.

I don't know if this booking arrangement will go on forever. It seems like already, they are combining years so that the pre-sale doesn't go on longer than a week. Maybe that will continue, maybe they will rearrange things as more and more people get pre-sale codes. 

That said, if the sound of the crowd when asked who was a first-timer this year at BTTI was any indication, there are a good amount of first-timers at each event. I am pretty sure it was one of the years at the Jewel where the number was in the triple digits. It may get to a point where we need to be concerned that there are no rooms available in the general sale, but I don't think that's the case yet. 


6

kellylizbeth

Kelly Davis
Astoria, New York, US

@Katie Have you ever not been in the first booking group? Because if you always get first dibs, it makes sense that you've always been able to secure a room/the type you wanted (lucky!)

I completely acknowledge that it's a "first world problem" to be low on the totem pole for booking BTTI. I'm just saying Hanson/Island Gigs could run the process differently so that it does not overtly favor people who have the means and ability to attend more often, which it does now.

7

eek_a_mouse

Seeing as we are all paying hanson.net members, it just seems a bit unfair to me that we are not all afforded the courtesy of having the same choice of rooms for a members event.  Return customers can easily be rewarded with extra perks/merch, if that's what they want to do, but the way this is handled is a bit off-putting to me.  I'm no less a member than someone who has attended before.  Just my two cents...

8

asphodelia

Paola Rizzato
Heysham, Lancashire, GB

I was just chatting to a friend who said that New Kids on the Block have exactly the same type of presale, by years of attendance. Whether it's fair or not, clearly there's an element of rewarding loyalty. I understand people being worried about not getting a room but there will be rooms, and seriously, it they didn't stagger the bookings, as @Joanne agreed too, it would go totally wrong. Imagine being charged for your deposit twice, by accident? One thing is to have $30 for Karaoke going out twice, another is to have $800 go out?

And yes maybe the booking system could be handled by a 3rd party agent, but maybe there are reasons why Hanson/IG don't do that? That might eat into profits, or complicate matters. I don't know.

Maybe people could come up with a suggestion for staggering the bookings in a truly fair way? Because I can't think of how (see my previous post about going alphabetically). And in the meantime, this is the only system we have that provides a totally glitch-free reservation process, where you know your card won't get charged twice, and you know that if you have any issues, you email Sven and within 3 nanoseconds he's got back to you. I know of people who phoned too and someone actually picks up the phone - now imagine that with a ticketing agency where you have to deal with a call centre, option 1, option 2...etc. I know what I'd rather choose.

6

kellylizbeth

Kelly Davis
Astoria, New York, US

Lottery? Hanson/IG designate a period where people request a presale code, and Hanson/IG do a random lottery to assign those people to booking groups. Pre-sale codes only get sent to people who asked for them. Then whatever's left after that randomly selected pre-sale is booked goes on general sale.

I also remain skeptical that there's not a logistical way to make booking 400 people at once more efficient/feasible, because other much bigger events seem to have figured this out. The NYC Marathon uses a lottery system to narrow over 100,000 non-guaranteed applicants down to 10,000 lottery winners. But I don't have the technical experience to troubleshoot website traffic problems.

1

Elianepferreira

Well they have to have some form of control. Maybe that was the only way they found it. Good, I gave up going due some negative comments about the resort and other things more. It's a lot of money to get upset.

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