Public Forums | General | Does this happen before elections in other countries too?

8

robinbond

Today was not the first time that the news bulletin on TV has featured a piece about some or other politician visiting some or other church on a Sunday and giving a speech... not a sermon... and I'll stop short of calling it campaigning... but I think it's mostly a cheap political trick. Does this happen in other countries, or is it just a South African thing?

Our elections are next year. Pluto is still in Capricorn until 2024. I expect an interesting shake-up.

3

Crimsongale

Generally, politicians will go where they feel they will have an influence. I'm not sure what the speech you are mentioning is about though. I know  here there isn't a day that goes by without a politician on the news and if things were different, my stress levels might not be so rampant! I'm sure other can relate..

10

lorehanson2005

lorena rodriguez
Buceo, Montevideo, UY

My country doesn´t have an official religion (i don´t know about your) so they never show themselves going to church or giving some speach there. Although, for example, we know our actual president is catholic, but he doesn´t use it for political porpuse....i don´t think it will make a different if they "play" with that, because, again, we have a lay state

3

Crimsongale

@lore very interesting... 

@robin someone the other day was reading an article  here in Canadaabout the water crisis pending in S.A. So you'll be happy to know the word is getting out!

8

robinbond

Oh yes. I know the pictures of one dam here have made the rounds on international TV. Fortunately, that is an extreme, and I hink dam levels are up slightly from 20.5%.

We don't have an official religion. Religious freedom here implies right to choose between expression of which ever religion one chooses. For a lot of indigenous African people here, tribal influence and custom means a lot of people engage in ancestor worship too.

7

eek_a_mouse

In the U.S., churches and non-profits don't pay taxes.  Donations by individuals to churches are also tax deductible.  From the early 1950s there has been a law on the books called the Johnson Amendment (named for former U.S. President Lyndon Johnson) which barred charitable organizations, non-profits and churches from making political endorsements.  If they violated this rule, they ran the risk of losing their tax-exempt status.  Last year, while trying to push through the new GOP tax bill, President Trump attempted to eliminate that amendment which, in essence, would allow religious groups to influence elections using millions of tax-exempt dollars.  The Johnson Amendment still stands, which is a small win for the Democrats.

I believe there should be a separation of church and state and that there should be no political grandstanding in any church setting, either by religious leaders or by politicians themselves.  

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